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Batting Out of Turn

Batting out of turn can be a little tricky, particularly when more that one batter bats out of turn.

In this scenario, numbers are used instead of Abel, Baker, etc.

Numbers 5,6,7 and 8 in the batting order are due to bat in the second inning. Number 7 leads off and doubles, followed by number 6, who sacrifices him to third. What happens if Number 5 then comes to bat and…

the mistake is discovered by the defense before a pitch is delivered to 5?

Since a pitch was made to 6, the double by 7 is legal and 8 should have been the proper batter instead of 6. Batter 8 is then called out, and 9 is the proper batter. Also, the runner who was sacrificed to third must return to second because the advance was a result of a batted ball hit by an improper batter.

5 takes a strike before the mistake is discovered by the defense?

Same ruling, except that 8 becomes the proper batter with a count of one strike. Again, no penalty is charged.

…5 takes a ball that goes to the backstop, bringing 7 in to score, before the mistake is discovered by the defense? The run counts and 8 becomes the proper batter with a count of one ball. Once again, no penalty is charged.

5 flies out, sacrificing 7 in from third, and then the mistake is discovered by the defense? The fly-out counts, but the sacrifice and run do not, and 7 is returned to third base. In this case, the action of 6 and 7 were legalized, 8 is charged with the at-bat, and 9 becomes the proper batter.

5 draws a walk, and then the mistake is discovered by the defense? The walk is nullified, 5 is removed from first base, and 8 (the proper batter in this case) is called out and charged with the at-bat. In this case, the action of 6 and 7 were legalized, and 9 becomes the proper batter.

Remember, in cases of batting out of order, neither the umpire nor the scorekeeper should bring it to the attention of either team. It is up to the defense to catch the mistake. The umpires should remind the scorekeeper of this before the game. The pertinent is Rule 6.07.

This is different from an ineligible pitcher or player. Anyone (including the opposing manager) who notices that an ineligible pitcher or player is about to enter the game should stop it before it happens. from the play.






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